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on booktv, "after words" with guest host anti-bullying at david's an action plan for teachers, parents and communities to combat the bullying crisis. this week cynthia lowen and her book "bully." ms. lowen talks about her documentary film and talks about essays from anti-bullying and stopping the epidemic of bullying in the u.s.. >> host: i am so delighted to be here today with cynthia lowen, the producer of the widely acclaimed and really important new documentary, "bully" and the coeditor of the book of the same title. both of which, as our nation's 30 little secret about bullying in schools across america. both the movie and the book put a human face on what it's about, how it impacts kids, on both sides and on the sideline, and their families. so thank you so much cynthia for being here today. why don't we start with you telling us a little bit about yourself? how did you get here? how did you get drawn to the issue? y. here, why now? >> guest: i come from a background as a writer and when i was in middle school, i was one of those kids who was really shy. i think i try to sail und
decisions in their ability to say you know what? i have to be responsible for my actions and these are not beavers i can do. couscous of the response of the adults that are supposed to be their helping the kids, protecting them, respecting them is critical isn't it to what happens to these kids. i think we will take a quick break now and come back and talk more about some of the solutions to the problem. this is -- bullying is probably easier to spot than it is to fix and i think that if we don't take a comprehensive approach sometimes we can make things worse and our kids are too precious, aren't they? okay so we will take a break now and we will be right back. >> host: let's talk a little bit more about school resource officers and safety officers. >> guest: i think they play an important role when they start to escalate into situations where you have text messaging, where it is happening over on facebook or where it is involving more serious incidents of physical assault. one thing i think parents find is when they have tried to resolve a situation through the school o
what, i have to be responsible for my actions and here are the things i can do. the response of the adults that are supposed to be there, helping kids, protecting them, it is very critical. it is very critical to what happens to the children. >> host: all right, i think we will take a quick break now. and we will come back and talk more about some of the solutions to the problem. bullying is probably easier to spot than it is to fix. >> guest: absolutely. >> host: i think that if we don't take a comprehensive approach, sometimes we can make things worse by bumbling. okay, we will take a break now and we will be right back. >> guest: thank you. >> host: okay. >> on the go? visit booktv.org and click on podcasts on the upper left side of the page. select which podcast he would like to download and listen to "after words" while you travel. >> host: let's talk a little bit more about the school safety officers. >> guest: these officers can play a very important role when situations start to escalate where you have text messaging and bullying is happening. also when it involves mo
impulsive decisions and their ability to say, you know what? i have to be responsible for my actions and these are not behaviors that i can do. the response of the adults who were supposed to be there helping them, respecting them is really critical, isn't it? >> guest: absolutely. >> host: to what happens to these kids. all right. um, i think we'll take a quick break now, and we'll come back, um, and talk more about some of the solutions to the problem. this is, bullying is, um, it's probably easier to spot than it is to fix. >> guest: absolutely. >> host: and i think that if we, um, if we don't take a comprehensive approach, sometimes we can make things worse by bumbling. >> guest: yep. >> host: and our kids are too precious to bumble with, aren't they? >> guest: yes. ghs okay. so we'll take a quick break, and we'll be right back. great. thank you, donna. >> on the go? after words is available through itunes and xml. visit booktv.org and click podcast on the upper left side of the page. select which podcast you'd like to download and listen to after words while you travel. >> host:
such as decision-making, inhibiting and proper actions. i mean, the neo cortex is a huge number of things. >> guest: it does lots of things that high on both levels and uses the same algorithm. i've recognized the ages of objects for crossfires ofa and obvious functions that he got at the high-level, how to recognize and say she's pretty but that was funny. it exists at the highest level of the conceptual hierarchy. one powerful piece of evidence that came out was what happens to be one, a region of the neo cortex of the optic nerve stillson, generally the process is a very primitive pattern and images, like the ages of objects. so this low-level, simple patterns. what happens to it and it congenitally blind person? it actually gets taken over by the frontal cortex to help that process high-level language concepts. so here's the same region in both level concepts is an high level, showing the algorithm is basically the same and the differences persist in the conceptual hierarchy. the hierarchy is created by the neo cortex itself. the actual physical connections that connect these 300 million module
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a spokesman for that action and now we have been firmly in the saddle, and politically it is a very different organization from what it was in 1968 very clearly. it's also been able to raise huge amounts of money and become maybe the most powerful lobby here in washington. and it plays basically on the backlash on people's fear of crime is rising and the police can't do anything about it, then how are we going to keep ourselves from being robbed and murdered, raped, salon? we need firearms to defend ourselves and they have certainly been playing on that for many years. >> host: but as the crime is rising and crack cocaine and the games and the sophisticated guns, the congress acted again. only the third time they acted to gun control. with a the brady bill and the assault weapon ban. how does that fit in? >> guest: well, you had the attempted assassination of president ronald reagan. it took him ten years to come around to supporting a stronger. he did of course in the brady bill, and he wrote an op-ed in "the new york times" which insure everybody has forgotten about but it's in the book say
countries, but it was the american actions primarily. some allies, the british for example, which leader of a wanted gold for. is that an adequate portrayal? >> guest: i would say that's accurate. we certainly don't consider the stalin to be blameless in all of this and we certainly don't downplay the brutality or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under the leadership. i think it's important to factor in, but look at the broad sweep of the history of the relationship with the soviet union beginning in 1917 and 1918 when the first sent the troops into the soviet union as part of a broad counterrevolutionary force led by the british and then the united states refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30's the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus and trying to stop hitler and they were leading the antifascist force globally coming and the calculus party was instrumental and they had to have a movement in the united states from that. but during the war after germany attacks the soviet union
countries but it was american actions primarily with some allies, the british for example which began the cold war. is that an accurate portrayal? >> guest: i would say that's accurate. we certainly don't consider stalin blameless in all of this and they certainly don't downplay stalin's fertility or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under stalin's leadership. i think that's important a factor in that if you look at the broad history of the united states relationship with the soviet union beginning in 1917 and 1918 when the united states first sent troops into the soviet union as part of a broader counterrevolutionary force led by the british, then the united states to refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then in the 30s the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus and trying to stop hitler. that led to anti-fascist forces globally in the communist in the anti-fascist movement in the united states after that but during the war after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states
actions primarily, with in allies, british, for example, which were involved in the cold war. is that accurate? >> i'd say that is accurate. certainly don't consider stalin blameless in all of this, and certainly don't downplay stalin's brutality or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under stalin's leadership. we think that's important to factor in but if you look at the broad sweep of the history of the united states' relationship with the soviet union, beginning in 1917-1918, when the united states first went to the soviet union, as part of a broader force led by the british, and then then united states' refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30s, the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus, and trying to stop hitler and they were beating bet antifast cysts, -- antifascists, and then the united states and the british decide they're going to support the soviet union because it's key to the chance office surviving the war, keep the soviets in the war. so the british were conc
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10